That World Doesn’t Exist Anymore…

“One of the key issues in an exponential world, whatever understanding you have today is going to rapidly become obsolete, and so you have to continue to refresh your education about technologies and about organizational capabilities. That’s going to be very challenging.”  -Salim Ismail Exponential Organizations

Working one job until retirement…

(According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average time in a single job is 4.2 years and individuals born in the latter years of the baby boom (1957-1964) held an average of 11.9 jobs from age 18-50.)

The lifespan of Fortune 500 companies…

(According to BBC News, the average lifespan of a company in the S&P 500 index has decreased by more than 50 years in the last century, from 67 years in the 1920’s to just 15 years today, according to Richard Foster from Yale University. He also estimates that by 2020, more than three-quarters of the S&P 500 will be companies we have not heard of yet.)

Big organizations are responsible for the main creation of new jobs…

(A recent study by Harvard and Princeton economists showed that 94% of net job growth from 2005 to 2015 was in ‘alternative work,’ defined as independent contractors and freelancers.)

The skills that got you here, will keep you here…

(A World Economic Forum report found that 63% of workers in the U.S. say they’ve participated in job related training in the past 12 months, yet employers are reporting the highest talent shortages since 2007. On average, by 2020, more than a third of the desired core skill sets of most occupations will be comprised of skills that are not yet considered crucial to the job today, according to the respondents.)

Phone Booths…

(According to Google, the number of mobile phone users in the world is expected to pass the 5 billion mark by 2019. In 2014, nearly 60% of the population worldwide already owned a mobile phone.)

According to The Telegraph and Business Insider here are few more things that technology have made obsolete in today’s world…

  • Printing out photographs
  • Getting film developed
  • Movie rental stores and VCR’s
  • Record stores, buying CD’s
  • Fax machines
  • Backing up your data on floppies or CD’s
  • Long-distance charges
  • Phone books, dictionaries, encyclopedias
  • Checking a map before or during a car journey
  • Dial-up Internet
  • VHS Tapes

Not to consider the jobs that no longer exist due to technology and the current level of digital disruption. The jobs and the percentage of work that we continually hear about as being on the verge of being replaced by automation, robots and artificial intelligence in the near future.

As an example, Fast Company shares these 10 jobs that will likely be replaced by robots…

  1. Insurance Underwriters and Claims Representatives
  2. Bank Tellers and Representatives
  3. Financial Analysts
  4. Construction Workers
  5. Inventory Managers and Stockists
  6. Farmers
  7. Taxi Drivers
  8. Manufacturing Workers
  9. Journalists
  10. Movie Stars

For which, Martin Ford shares, “The impact that accelerating progress has on the job market and overall economy is poised to defy much of conventional wisdom.”

Of which Ford adds, “Technology is not just advancing gradually: it is accelerating.  As a result, the impact may come long before we expect it…”

Preparing for this automated, augmented, artificially intelligence infused future is difficult to imagine, let alone prepare effectively for, both as individuals and organizations. So the objective then becomes, not to try and predict the future (which is impossible), but to try and forecast and determine those signals for the future that are arising from the chaos of the present. It is in understanding…

Preparing our students for an automated future, is a much different proposition.

For which I will leave you with this excerpt from The Economist (Economist Intelligence Unit-EIU) report sponsored by Google, Driving the Skills Agenda: Preparing Students for the Future, “It is also a safe bet that most Americans will need to acquire new knowledge and skills over their work lives in order to earn a good living in a changing work world. In this context, the nation’s challenge is to sharply increase the fraction of American children with the foundational skills needed to develop job-relevant knowledge and to learn efficiently over a lifetime.”

For what we are learning and realizing more and more, is that the world we grew up in, the world that we so easily recognized, may no longer exist anymore…

It is in realizing what changes, AND in what stays the same, that we can more effectively support our individuals and organizations in moving more successfully into this new and unknown future.

And also realizing that human aspirations such as love, compassion, caring, understanding, resilience, empathy, imagination, inventiveness, creativity, emotional intelligence and awareness tend to continually stand the test of time.

Or as Faisal Hoque and Drake Baer share in Everything Connects, “We have to assume that everything we think is right today will be wrong tomorrow.”

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